DISCLAIMER

DISCLAIMER: I have no association with UVB-76 station, neither do I have any clue what is the content I am relaying. I can only assure, that the signal is received on 4.625MHz AM-modulated 900km NW from supposed origin and retransmitted unaltered. In no way can I guarantee this service, nor be considered responsible of any content re-transmitted. The only purpose for this relay to exist is because lot of people who do not have equipment or are located too far from station seem to be interested about listening to it. Should the UVB-76 station- or transmission content owners feel violated in any way, please contact me at uvb76.repeater@gmail.com and we will work it out.

Note, that because of shortwave radio signal propagation specifics the station can be more or less reliably received from around 4pm to 6am GMT on summertime. It is almost 24h audible during the winter, with short "skip-zone" blank-out around 6pm GMT.

The USB feed is considered as main source of audio today, as the voice messages are much better audible there than on the AM stream. However, the buzzer sound from the AM stream is somewhat more pleasant to listen at, so both feeds are kept simultaneously.

Thursday, September 9, 2010

UVB-76 Back On Air

At a convenient time of 16.20 UTC the UVB-76 finally reappeared on air with stronger signal than many have ever seen after being down almost exactly one week. With the good propagation conditions supporting it, the UK amateurs are able to receive it at amazing level (S9+10dB for those initiated), while Russian hams are picking it up at magnificient S9+40dB  (This is VERY STRONG SIGNAL, everybody).
Russian amateurs report the buzzer signal components being audible at strong levels on 4.667 (S9+5dB), 4.709 (S9), 4.751 (S8).

There were several voice transmissions, pops, clicks, and line noise occasions preceeding the buzzer reappearance earlier on September 8, but considering the current transmissions and quite coherent receiveing pattern from Europe to Russia, the current transmission looks plausable as UVB-76, although with unusually high signal level.

The voice messages transmitted have, however, rised the question of the callsign change for UVB-76, as several voice broadcasts on September 8 have been starting with the callsign MDZhB. While this remains an open question at the moment, lets summarize the last weeks events once agin, as this has been, as both, the Russian radio scanner forum and our own UVB-76 form have concluded, a week-long real life episode from LOST!

So, here's the chronology:

- September 1, 2010 4.05UTC the UVB-76 cheased to transmit anything. The absence of the signal was apparent, when no buzzer could be heard from the Internet feeds after the 4pm UTC, when something should have been audible under any circumstances.

- September 1, 22.19UTC the first supposed service acivities were observed. The faint carrier signal reappeared first on 4.626MHz and got adjusted to the 4.625MHz. However, no modulated signal was transmitted of any kind. With 450+ listeners on all Temporary Internet Repeater streams simultaneously and more than 3.5Gbytes daily outbound traffic from file store, the UVB-76 gained unprecedented attention and fanclub since the voice transmission on August 23 voice transmission. However, what we did not have was a UVB-76 signal of any kind.

- September 1, 22.25UTC the UVB-76 started to play a audio sequence, what consisted of the piece from the "Swan's Lake" and 10 buzzer sounds. The pattern was repeated throughout the next 12 hours. Although put in doubt later because of various frequency hijacking attempts, it has been deemed an original transmission from UVB-76, as it was simultaneously received at the Temporary Internet Repeater and Russian amateurs much closer to the station.

- September 2..5 a large amount of CW and voice messages were observed. While ths UVB-76 carrier was missing most of the time, it appeared and re-appeared constantly.
At the same time the first confirmed pirate transmissions were observed by European amateurs. Which traffic from that period was genuine and what was a result of piracy remains unknown (except on some explict cases where forum members were addressed directly and on ome particular shortwave graffiti case found below)

- September 5..7 revealed a prank on the Winrad waterfall screen, codenamed XYN. The first ever shortwawe graffity was born and public. As the prank went on for quite some time, an official warning was announced that the frequency hijacking attempts will be reported to the repeater home country local communication authorities. The frequency went mute and stayed this way for the most part of the September 6 and 7, with occasional carrier frequency appearing and disappearing on 4.625MHz.

- September 8 the occasional carrier appeared and disappeared, with three buzzer tests. At 10.29am UTC the carrier was appearing about 500Hz above the 4.625MHz and USB voice transmission was given by female voice. The transmission was cut off abruptly in the moddle. However, the latter suggests that two transmitters were active simultaneously, as a female voice received on 4.625MHz USB did not have any noticeable pitch shift. The voice messages reappeared together with buzer tests on 16.00UTC (female), 16.13UTC (male) and 16.18 (female). The UVB-76 got finally back on air at 16.20 UTC sometimes faint and unstable signal first, then switcing over to the very high transmission power after which the signal has been stable.

10:28 Female Voice, 500Hz carrier drift
16:00 Female Voice, Cut Short
16:13 Male counting 1-10
16:18 Female Voice and Buzzer Returns

There is also a WinradHD screenshot available what displays the frequency spectrum for 22 hours starting from September 7, 20.30 UTC














One can check the details of the last week events also Here!

The original recordings of the UVB-76 Temporary Internet Repeater can be found here:

UVB-76 Temporary Internet Repeater AM Feed Archive
UVB-76 Temporary Internet Repeater USB Feed Archive  

(The file times are UTC+3)

The good public archive recording by one stream listener with the recordings split to smaller pieces can be found here.

4 comments:

  1. http://www.random-interrupt.org/blog/2010/09/09/the-buzzer/

    I suspect that the downtime was caused by maintenance that conicided with the OSK reorganization, the storms, and the fire- Moscow has been busy :D

    ReplyDelete
  2. Quite busy. I think trying to keep the country from burning and flooding is a bit more important than a buzzer...

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anyone know when this sound happened? This video is definitely UVB-76 at the start, but at 1:26 it changes. Was that an actual broadcast, or did someone mess with it?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UX0lyxyE2iY

    ReplyDelete
  4. The youtube link is a recording of an older format where they sent a continuous buzz at the hour.

    ReplyDelete