DISCLAIMER

DISCLAIMER: I have no association with UVB-76 station, neither do I have any clue what is the content I am relaying. I can only assure, that the signal is received on 4.625MHz AM-modulated 900km NW from supposed origin and retransmitted unaltered. In no way can I guarantee this service, nor be considered responsible of any content re-transmitted. The only purpose for this relay to exist is because lot of people who do not have equipment or are located too far from station seem to be interested about listening to it. Should the UVB-76 station- or transmission content owners feel violated in any way, please contact me at uvb76.repeater@gmail.com and we will work it out.

Note, that because of shortwave radio signal propagation specifics the station can be more or less reliably received from around 4pm to 6am GMT on summertime. It is almost 24h audible during the winter, with short "skip-zone" blank-out around 6pm GMT.

The USB feed is considered as main source of audio today, as the voice messages are much better audible there than on the AM stream. However, the buzzer sound from the AM stream is somewhat more pleasant to listen at, so both feeds are kept simultaneously.

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Happy Birthday, Repeater!

It just occurred to me, that UVB-76 Temporary Internet Repeater has a one-year birthday today!
While the first tests were made already on 6'th, the 8'th of June is the date since the repeater has been up and running more or less non-stop.

It has been a rewarding time in every sense and I would like to thank all of you who have gathered around the repeater during this year - you are the best audience one web project could ever wish!

3 comments:

  1. Thanks for maintaining the repeater. You've done a great work!
    I live in Tallinn too, so I sometimes use it to compare live audio with the repeater stream.

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  2. I'd just like to repeat what Edwin said about repeating the UVB-76 signal :) Thank you for all your efforts, Mr. Laid. Having a 24/7 facility to 'listen in' like this makes it much more likely we will catch an unusual transmission as it's in progress, and hopefully learn something new about it's purpose.

    Hopefully, I now have something of my own to contribute back to this effort:

    I stumbled across a very interesting signal of my own last night, at 4215 kHz in the UK, around 2045 UTC. It sounds to me like the Russian Buzzer in it's pattern and behaviour, EXCEPT that after four buzzes, it let off a burst of smaller buzzers, before pausing and then restarting all over again.

    This station can't just be a repeater of the 4625 kHz signal, however, because whilst 4215 was broadcasting it's own variant, the 'original buzzer' was broadcasting it's usual pattern of long buzzes only on 4625 kHz.

    I'd love to hear your thoughts on this signal. Do you think it could be related? I wish we know where it was being broadcast from. One would assume the same site, but why would it be broadcasting two separate signals on two separate frequencies? Two open mikes in two separate rooms at the same facility? Or perhaps it's from another site, or another country...? I guess we can only speculate. In any case, I made a recording for you, and created a new Youtube channel to upload it to. (I've decided I'll use it to catalogue anything unusual I find on the SW band. Please feel free to comment.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdDZSAfB-5o

    Steve

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  3. I've caught a similar signal sometimes (but it was long time ago, so I don't know even the approximate frequency - don't have a digital receiver).
    According to Global Frequency Database (qrg.globaltuners.com), the signal is on 4.216MHz (CW), the transmitter is located in Istanbul.

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